Posts Tagged “psychology”

Hypnosis: The Inner Workings of the Mind

psychic reading

Hypnosis, you either like it or are scared of it. That is generally the reactions I have been getting since my hypnosis certification in January. So of course…..I have to blog about what Hypnosis really is and how it can help you 🙂

When I first heard of my teacher Tim Horn of Hypnoconsult LLC  as a hypnotist, I was fearful. You want to “put me under” and do what?! I shudder to think back to those early days of my ignorance and how uncomfortable I must have made Tim feel. I asked him every cliched thing in the book I could because well, honestly my knowledge of hypnosis was based solely on tv shows!

“Are you going to make me cluck like a chicken?”  No.

“Am I not going to remember?” No.

“Am I going to look stupid?” You do that on your own. 😉

But thankfully, Tim is a patient man and he suffered through my silly questions in order to educate me about his profession. Am I glad he did! When I met Tim years ago, we did a trade where I offered him massage in exchange for hypnosis. I was dealing with overweight issues and had a sweet tooth unfortunately. To this day I remember my first hypnosis session with Tim clearly and was so impressed with it, that I went on to take training through Tim’s program and become a certified hypnotist myself.

Here are some things to note about my personal experience with hypnosis:

1) I remember most to everything said

Many times the fear associated with hypnosis is that we will be “under some type of spell” and not conscious of what is happening. Then the evil hypnotist can take advantage of us! Well media had something to do with that because when I was hypnotized, I was very aware of what was happening, albeit in a relaxed state. To best describe it, I can hear car alarms going off and dogs barking, but I have no desire to move or respond, I am in such a peaceful state.

2) Hypnosis works! 

Hypnosis works because while in the hypnotic state, a client is more open to suggestions. Our analytical and calculating conscious mind is resting, so the subconscious mind is in full play, and this mind tends to be more open and accepting of new ideas. If I could imagine my mind talking, it would look like this for me:

Hypnotist: You feel very happy when you are exercising, in fact you crave exercising, you crave it so much, you want to do it everyday for at least an hour at a time.

Conscious mind: no way dude! I have sciatica pain, do you know how that will hurt? and where will I find the time? An hour! are you kidding me?!

Subconscious mind: Okay.

When Tim hypnotized me, we addressed my love of chocolate cake. Ohhh its sinful. I can eat a whole cake by myself. I remember vaguely him saying that I don’t really care for chocolate cake anymore and it reminds me of sweaty socks. No lie, to this day, i can probably have a bite or two of chocolate cake but then I hear Tim’s voice about the sweaty socks and I stop eating immediately! This is three years later!

3) Changes are permanent

Just like my chocolate cake dilemma, other new behaviors have embedded within me. Hypnosis doesn’t address your conscious mind, it address the subconscious realm which dictates 85% of our behavior in real time. When you have one session with a hypnotist, usually you notice results right away. I tend to offer a three pack session when working because in each following session, I build on the first one to really anchor the suggestion down. This makes the change more permanent and a greater possibility to last.

4) You are awake and cognizant

If there was a fire in the building, I would jump up and run out with everyone else. Hypnosis does not prevent you from self survival or put you in harm. Remember in the subconscious realm, you are open to suggestions ONLY IF it is acceptable to you. If I was with a hypnotist and she tried to assault me physically in any way, I would stop her because I would not be open to that behavior. I explain this in detail to clients because there is the general fear about getting hypnotized by a male hypnotist and being taken advantage of. This is nonsense! While I can’t speak for ALL male hypnotists, I can speak for the few I know (Tim and Rob) and believe me, they are interested more in helping you overcome your addictions and problems than peeking down your shirt. Have some faith people!

All in all, I have had some tremendous success with my hypnosis clients. I have worked on a woman who had social anxiety issues and she reported back that she went out to a bar with friends that weekend. I have worked on a man with smoking addictions and he quit after the first session. I have also worked on a woman with weight loss goals and she has lost over 20 pounds and now crave healthy foods.

Curious? Give it a try! I am including my contact info as well as my friends who do it as well. We are here to help and hypnosis truly does work.

Uma: uma@lotuswellnesscenter.net

Tim: timhornphd@aol.com

Rob: reikiwlb@gmail.com

Posted on: June 27th, 2016 No Comments

Why be mindful?

You’ve probably heard the term mindful or mindfulness. It’s getting a lot of good press lately. So, what’s mindfulness all about and why should we bother?

First, there’re a few different ways the word mindful or mindfulness can be used, so let’s get clear on we’re talking about. The word mindfulness can refer to mindfulness meditation, which is based on a Buddhist meditation; mindful can be a character trait, such as, ‘Bob is always so mindful of other people’s feelings.’; and it can be a practice of a moment to moment awareness of what you’re experiencing emotionally and physically without judgment. We’ll be discussing this last definition.

What does it mean to be mindful in this way? It means to observe what you’re feeling, seeing, smelling, tasting, touching, and hearing without assigning a judgment of good or bad, pleasant or unpleasant, or fun or boring.

To practice mindfulness in this way, it is much easier to start with experiences that are already fairly neutral for you. Most of us don’t think too much about brushing our teeth, but this can be a great place to start. It’s very experiential and something we do a couple of times a day. Start with how the toothbrush feels in your hand. How does the toothpaste smell? How does it taste? What do the bristles feel like on your gums? What are you seeing as you brush your teeth? What do you hear? Are you aware of any emotions as you’re brushing your teeth? The point of this exercise is to start observing these things. Once you can brush your teeth mindfully, you can add in other activities.

The real question is, ‘Why should we bother?’ According to the American Psychological Association (APA)[1], there are many benefits of being mindful. These include:

  1. Reduced rumination.
  2. Stress reduction.
  3. Boosts to working memory.
  4. Focus.
  5. Less emotional reactivity.
  6. More cognitive flexibility.
  7. Relationship satisfaction.

Have thoughts that go around and around in your head like they’re on a loop? That’s rumination and can be eased with mindfulness. Stress? Does that even need to be a question in our society? You can reduce stress with mindfulness. There are many benefits and there are more to be found if you’re looking.

According to the APA, in addition to these benefits, being mindful has other side effects. These include:

  1. Empathy.
  2. Compassion.
  3. Decreased stress and anxiety.
  4. Better quality of life.

These are pretty great as far as effects of a simple practice go. I’ll also add that finding more gratitude is another effect many people find of mindfulness.

Does this mean that mindfulness will make your life a piece of cake? No, absolutely not. What it does mean is that you will be more clear-headed and focused; less stressed; and more compassionate in your day-to-day life. That will certainly improve the quality of your life.

There are additional ways to increase your mindfulness. You can join a meditation or get a Reiki session. These are great ways to increase mindfulness in a very focused way. In a meditation, you’ll often focus on chanting a mantra, which helps to increase focused attention. Some meditations will follow up chanting with a mindfulness meditation, which, as its name implies, is a practice of mindfulness. A Reiki session can help you handle stress better, be more relaxed, worry less, and/or being less emotionally reactive. If you’re having a hard time with your mindfulness practice, having a Reiki session can help get you in a good frame of mind to continue your practice.

Please do notice that I’m using the word ‘practice’ a lot through this article. Remember that mindfulness is a practice, something to continually develop and work at. Be gentle with yourself through this practice. Enjoy mindfulness, its benefits, and its wonderful effects.

If you’d like to book a Reiki session with Micha, please mention this article to receive 20% off your first session.

[1] http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/07-08/ce-corner.aspx

Posted on: July 27th, 2015 No Comments